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The International Journal of Motorcycle Studies (IJMS) is dedicated to the study and discussion of motorcycling culture in all its forms—from the experience of riding and racing to the history of the machine, the riders and design to the images of motorcycling and motorcyclists in film, advertising and literature. We welcome submissions on all areas related to the cultural phenomenon of motorcycling. We invite contributions from all members of the motorcycling community.

Click on this link to learn more about our mission and values: Peer-Reviewed, Timely, Global and Free: Online Scholarly Publication

The journal is published in the spring and fall.

ISSN 1931-275X

Editorial Board

Steven Alford completed his graduate work in Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He teaches at Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. With Suzanne Ferriss, he is the author of Motorcycle (Reaktion Books, London, 2008). He rides a Triumph Sprint ST.

Ted Bishop rides a Ducati and teaches English at the University of Alberta , Canada. He has published articles on James Joyce and Virginia Woolf, written motorcycling articles for Rider magazine and Cycle Canada. He is the author of Riding with Rilke: Reflections on Motorcycles and Books (Penguin Canada/Norton USA) which Playboy listed as a “Best Book” for 2006. But they didn’t invite him to pose.

Michael J. Chappell is an associate professor in the English Department at Western Connecticut State University. A rider since 1970, he currently pilots a red 1999 BMW R1100S.


Suzanne Ferriss is a professor of English at Nova Southeastern University. Her publications include two volumes on the cultural study of fashion, A Handbook of Literary Feminisms, and two edited collections on chick lit and chick flicks. With Steven Alford, she is the author of Motorcycle (Reaktion Books, London, 2008). She currently rides a 2005 Yamaha FZ1.


Timothy Holmes is a lecturer in the School of Journalism , Media and Cultural Studies at Cardiff University , Wales , specializing in the historical and cultural aspects of magazine journalism. He spent 15 years as a journalist and editor on a range of motorcycling titles in the UK , the final one his own publication. He shares a Triumph T140V with his wife and pours cash into a hole called "restoration of a 1960 Trophy 650."

Gary Kieffner is an assistant professor of Ethics and Governance at the Fiji National University, Lautoka Campus. His interdisciplinary research is in transnational material culture, gender, late colonialism in the South Pacific and comparative indigenous land tenure systems. Kieffner's teaching fields in the disciplines of history, ethics and governance include World Borderlands, the South Pacific, Mexico and the United States of America, socio-cultural, legal and holocaust studies, and historiography. He rides the world’s first "burnt orange" Harley-Davidson.

 

Randy D. McBee is an associate professor of history at Texas Tech University where he teaches courses in recent U.S. history and U.S. immigration and urban history. He is the author of Dance Hall Days: Intimacy and Leisure Among Working Class Immigrants in the United States (New York University Press, 2000) and is currently writing a history of the motorcyclist/biker since the end of World War II.

 

Caryn Simonson is Course Leader for BA (Hons) Textile Design at the University of the Arts London (Chelsea College of Art and Design). She organized the 3rd IJMS conference in London (2013) and co-curated the accompanying exhibition Motorcycle Cultures: fashioning bikes, building identities. She teaches across theory and practice and is a member of the Textile Environment Design (TED) and Textile Futures Research Centre groups (TFRC) at the university. As an artist and curator, she has presented work across photography, video, sculpture, installation and writing. She has previously co-curated exhibitions including Textile Transporter at arttransponder Gallery, Berlin and an exhibition of TFRC members’ work in the 3D digital online social networking environment Second Life. In 2008 she guest-edited a special themed issue—Skin and Cloth—for Textile: The Journal of Cloth and Culture (Berg, 2008); she also serves on the journal’s International Advisory Editorial Board. Caryn rides a 2005 Harley-Davidson Sportster 883 and a 1983 Moto Morini 3.5 Strada.

Katherine Sutherland is Associate Vice President Academic at Thompson Rivers University in British Columbia , Canada, where she created a course called “Motorcycles, Speed and Literature.” Her primary areas of research and publication are postcolonial and women's studies, as well as sports culture. She has published scholarly and popular articles on hockey, soccer and motorcycling, in publications such as Cycle Canada and English Studies in Canada.

 

James J. Ward is Professor of History and Director of the Honors Program at Cedar Crest College in Allentown, Pennsylvania.  His degrees are from Middlebury College and New York University.  His enthusiasm for British motorcycles began when he over-wintered in a fraternity house room with a DBD34 Gold Star and became permanent with the subsequent acquisition of a Velocette Thruxton (in the days when British singles were being given away). Both, alas, are long gone, but the affection remains.

 

 

 

 

Editors

Christian A. Pierce currently lives and works in Atlanta, Georgia where he is pursuing a PhD in History at Georgia Tech while employed by Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. The purchase of his first motorcycle coincided with his entrance into graduate school and the two events soon became intertwined. While studying Film and Television at Emory University he began an analysis of biker movies that has continued to this day. His study has dealt with a vast array of subjects/themes from stunting videos to the demise of Buell Motorcycles. Of late, he has been intrigued by the portrayal of motorcycling as a sport and the infrequent representation of this subject in popular culture. He rides a 2002 Suzuki Bandit 1200, a 2005 Suzuki DRZ400SM, and a 2008 Kawasaki Ninja 650R.

 

Charles Johnson is a professor at Valdosta State University where he expects his students to think for themselves in his American, German, International, Motorcycle and Popular Culture Studies courses. In the real work, he rides on a never-ending journey aboard either his C50 Boulevard or his R1200RT for the perfect cup of coffee.

Reviews Editor

Sheila Malone is currently a PhD student in Theater and Performance Studies at UCLA, where she is researching the intersections of gender, technology, performance and motorcycles. Malone teaches at Cabrillo College in the Art Photography Department and El Camino College in the Theater Department. She received an MFA in Digital Media Arts from CADRE (Computers in Art, Design and Education) Laboratory for New Media at San Jose State University and a BA in Theatre Arts from Virginia Tech University. Her art explores sexuality, gender, technology and American culture. Her documentary films SF Dykes on Bikes® and Annie Sprinkle’s Amazing World of Orgasm have been shown throughout the world.

 

Submissions Editor

John Sumser is a sociologist and a professor in the Communications Studies Department at California State University, Stanislaus. His main ride is a Triumph Street Triple, but he is building a Honda CB160 racer and looking longingly at a Moto Guzzi Griso.

Web Master

Tim Fransen is a Graphic Designer and Media Centre Coordinator at South Essex College, Southend-on-Sea, UK. He runs a motorcycle travel book publishers called Essex-Dakar Books (www.essex-dakar.org) and an interactive timeline charting the history of motorcycle travel literature for the IJMS (check out the Resources page). With Steven Alford and Suzanne Ferriss, he has produced An Anthology Of Early British Motorcycle Travel Literature (Essex-Dakar Books, 2009) and is currently working on another book about one of his motorcycle adventures. He currently rides a 2011 Brompton folding bicycle.

Conference Coordinators

Lisa Garber is a psychologist, social worker and author with a doctorate in clinical psychology.  She has been treating eating disorders and other forms of psychic distress for 30 years.  For the last 24 years she had been riding her Harley, while wondering and writing about her attraction to the two-wheeled predator.   Her musings led her to the crossroads where the union of Hermes and Bruhnhilde took place.   It is from that perspective that she wrote her doctoral dissertation,  Women Who Ride: The Psyche of the Female Motorcyclist, exploring the manifest myth of the female motorcyclist.   Dr. Garber has been published in both biker and women’s magazines.   Riding Naked, a booklet based on her dissertation is currently available on her web site: http://www.ridingnaked.net. A book based on her series of conversations, “The Voice Inside my Helmet,” is soon to be released.

K. Alex Ilyasova is an assistant professor in the English department and the director of the professional and technical writing program at the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs. She came to motorcycle studies by way of popular culture studies and through her interest in the trademark case involving the San Francisco Dykes on Bikes®. She rides a 2003 Kawasaki Vulcan 500.

Graphic Designer

Alice Sexton has worked as a design professional for thirty years and has been ridng motorcycles for over twenty. She has served as National President of the Women's International Motorcyclist Association - USA Division (WIMAUSA). She has been a contributor to Road Racing World magazine and Motorcyclist magazine. Alice commutes to work daily in Los Angeles on a 2000 Suzuki SV650, races a 1987 Cagiva Allazzura with WSMC, and takes her 1978 MotoGuzzi Lemans for tourning and weekend rides.